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In Their Own Words: Anthony Carpi

Dr. Anthony Carpi, professor and dean of research at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, (PAESMEM 2009), discusses his findings on whether undergraduate research experiences lead to a new interest among students in pursuing a graduate degree. Carpi’s article in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching explores the outcomes of a program he leads at his college that paired undergraduate students with faculty engaged in university research projects.

In Their Own Words: Cheryl Schrader

Dr. Cheryl Schrader, former chancellor, Missouri University of Science and Technology, (PAESMEM 2005), who became president of Wright State University in Ohio on July 1, discusses the importance of role models and experiential learning in helping to broaden participation among underrepresented groups and women.

In Their Own Words: Raymond Johnson

Raymond Johnson, professor emeritus of mathematics, University of Maryland, College Park, (PAESMEM 2012), shares his thoughts about mathematical achievement, mentoring and misconceptions about innate ability.

In Their Own Words: James Cotter

Dr. James Cotter, professor of geology at the University of Minnesota, Morris, (PAESMEM 2000), who mentors undergraduate students, including Native Americans and women, outlines tips for effective mentoring, including learning together, listening and cross-cultural understanding.

In Their Own Words: Sara Hernández

Ms. Sara Xayarath Hernández (PAESMEM Organizational 2011), associate dean for inclusion and student engagement at Cornell University Graduate School, says universities can make undergraduate research experiences more accessible for underrepresented students interested in STEM careers by leveraging existing resources and programs.

In Their Own Words: Margaret Werner-Washburne

Dr. Margaret Werner-Washburne, professor of biology at the University of New Mexico, (PAESMEM 2003), talks about the value and importance of broadening participation in STEM.

In Their Own Words: Philip Huebner

Philip Huebnerdirector of STEM partnerships and diversity officer for the South Dakota Experimental Program for Competitive Research (SD EPSCOR), (PAESMEM Organizational 1997), says that since he began working with the EPSCOR program, he has focused on starting the STEM mentoring process at younger ages.   

In Their Own Words: Solomon Bililign

Dr. Solomon Bililign, professor of physics, North Carolina A&T State University, (PAESMEM 2010), on how APS, the professional society for physicists, helps parents and students better understand career options for physics majors.

In Their Own Words: Juan Arratia

Dr. Juan F. Arratia, executive director of the AGMUS Student Research Development Center, Universidad Metropolitana, Puerto Rico, (PAESMEM 2006), discusses the keys to STEM mentoring success.

In Their Own Words: Christine Grant

Dr. Christine Grant, associate dean of faculty advancement in the College of Engineering and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, North Carolina State University, (PAESMEM 2003), discusses three tips for STEM mentors.

In Their Own Words: Elizabeth Yanik

Dr. Elizabeth “Betsy” Yanik, professor of mathematics, Emporia State University, Kansas, (PAESMEM 2004), talks about the importance of women and Hispanic role models in STEM, particularly in rural areas.

In Their Own Words: Tilak Ratnanather

Dr. Tilak Ratnanather, associate research professor of biomedical engineering, Johns Hopkins University, (PAESMEM 2012), provides advice for students with hearing loss on the challenge of being ignored in the classroom.

In Their Own Words: Murty S. Kambhampati

Dr. Murty S. Kambhampati, professor of biology and chair of the Department of Natural Sciences at Southern University at New Orleans (PAESMEM 2012), shares his thoughts about the keys to helping minority students become successful in STEM.

In Their Own Words: GeoFORCE Texas

Mr. Doug Ratcliff, retired geologist and founding director of GeoFORCE, and Dr. Samuel Moore, director of outreach and diversity at GeoFORCE (PAESMEM Organizational 2012), describe the program and the merits of learning about science outside the classroom.

In Their Own Words: Elizabeth Parry

Ms. Elizabeth "Liz" Parry, coordinator of The Engineering Place in the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University (PAESMEM 2012), explains the importance of teaching engineering to grade school students.

In Their Own Words: Luis Colón

Dr. Luis Colón, professor of chemistry at SUNY-Buffalo and co-founder of the Institute for Strategic Enhancement of Educational Diversity (iSEED) (PAESMEM 2013), explains how research opportunities help students become successful.

In Their Own Words: Lorraine Fleming

Dr. Lorraine Fleming, professor of civil and environmental engineering, College of Engineering, Architecture and Computer Sciences at Howard University (PAESMEM 2013), explains why role models and mentoring are critical for attracting more women and African-Americans to STEM careers.

In Their Own Words: John Matsui

Dr John Matsui, assistant dean of biological sciences, Integrative Biology Department, College of Letters and Science at the University of California, Berkeley and co-founder and director of Biology Scholars Program (PAESMEM 2013), discusses the imperative for diversity in the STEM fields.

Math, Cars, and Rock n' Roll

Richard Tapia ('96) reflects on his career, and particularly on his experiences mentoring underrepresented students in STEM. 
Dr. Tapia, a mathematician from Rice Univerisity, recently received the 2014 Vannevar Bush Award for long-term leadership in STEM and for his many public service contributions.

2014 National Mentoring Month Google+ Hangout with PAESMEM recipients

During National Mentoring Month, NSF sponsored a Google+ Hangout on STEM mentoring. Maria Zacharias interviewed several PAESMEM recipients, as well as Fae Jencks, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and NSF Assistant Director Joan Ferrini-Mundy, who leads the Education and Human Resources directorate.

Practicing Mentoring

YouTube video featuring 2009 PAESMEM awardee Jo Handelsman, from Yale University. Handelsman describes guidelines that she and her colleagues have developed to help scientists become better mentors. These include listening, asking questions, stating expectations, building independence, and looking at things from the perspective of the mentee or protégé. Good advice for scientists at all stages of their careers.